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Ecstatic Orgasm: Sexual Shaman Kenneth Ray Stubbs

Kenneth Ray Stubbs is known for his books and DVDs on erotic massage and his book Women of the Light: The New Sacred Prostitute. This book introduced women who practiced various sex-related careers; he referred to them as “sacred prostitutes,” women who used erotic practices and activities for healing, education, and other purposes.

During the years since he published Women of the Light, he has been participating in Native American healing ceremonies. The Native American rituals were based on ceremonies traditionally led by tribal medicine men or shamans. He discovered a number of similarities between the practices and abilities of the shamans and the sacred prostitutes, both of whom facilitate rituals for personal transformation, divination, and healing.

Shamans and sacred sex workers share the ability of allowing the consciousness of non-embodied beings to come through their own bodies. They merge their personal energetic fields with those of the persons being healed as well as with those of non-physical beings who help them do the healing. They also have regular practices by which they can build the energy in their bodies to make it available for their work. The similarity of shamans' and sacred prostitutes' practices, skills, and intentions for their work brought Ray to the conclusion that a better name for sacred prostitutes today is “sexual shaman.” It doesn't carry the negative connotations of the word “prostitute,” and it emphasizes the healing and transformational nature of the work they do.

Ray has very specific ideas about shamanism. “Some people approach shamanism from a symbolic point of view. I don't. It's the alchemy of the energy for me,” he says. The ability to work with one's personal energy is the fundamental skill needed to become a shaman. This energy goes by many names: prana, chi, and kundalini among them. It is an individual component of the same energy that creates and maintains the universe, to which it is connected.

Ray says that there is a “basic energetic infrastructure” required to do shamanic work, one that's “all about energy, wisdom and intent.” He has seen the presence of this infrastructure, and the abilities to build, maintain, and direct one's personal energy, in members of three different groups of people: Native American medicine people, Tibetan Lamas, and Tantra teachers.

However, some of the offshoots of these groups are not sufficient. In some cases, people do the form but not the essence of these practices. For instance, in the mid 1970s, Ray participated in Tantra pujas in Marin County, California. He describes the events as loving and social. There were good practices that had value, but for him there was “not enough juice;” it was “watered down” to work for lots of people. He believes that's good, but to make a sexual practice that is shamanic requires more energetic merging.

Ray believes that those who want to develop shamanic capabilities must learn to intensify, build, direct, and merge their energies. It is when your intentions are clear and your energies are merged and intensified that “things happen!” This requires practice, and here's the good news: The way to get the type of energy needed to do shamanic abilities is to orgasm.

“Have lots of orgasms to get on the path,” he says. Of course, there's also a route for those who are celibate. Celibacy works for those who are highly developed. They let go of sexual activities and merge their energetic core to be one with Source. More on that in a moment.

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Why no gay shamanism?

Gay men have been practicing shamanism for ages, yet Ken Stubbs does not mention them at all. They have also worked as "sacred adepts," a term for gay men who teach other men how to achieve ecstatic states—again why no mention of this? This would have been a very good, and important, piece had Stubbs not gone into generalities, and failed to give any specifics at all.

Perry Brass, author of Carnal Sacraments, A Historical Novel of the Future.

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Margaret Wade
July 1st, 2009
Margaret Wade's picture
Margaret L. Wade is an adult educator, writer, and certified sexological bodyworker. Margaret has taught, written, and presented papers in the fields of education, computer information systems,...